Restoring curiosity and humour

curiousity and humour

“Simply notice what the mind does with curiosity and humour” – Gary Hennessey

I know that when I am stressed and overwhelmed, I fall back into old habits.  One of my unhelpful habits is that of being judgemental of myself and, as a consequence, I lose my curiosity and humour.

Stress often builds up very gradually for me and it is essential for my well-being that I recognise and acknowledge this.  I have learnt that the cure to this is to be kind and compassionate towards myself.  When I am curious and playful – both aspects of mindfulness – it helps me to also become resilient and resourceful. 

In essence, the mind believes it has our best interest at heart but it is often distracted and pulled away from its natural path of wisdom and wholeness.

Rachel Podger

I have turned around many things in my life and I have achieved this through being aware of the build-up of stress piggybacking on itself.  When I felt stress lurking under my skin and within my being, I turned to transpersonal psychotherapy and mindfulness, UL20 and became more curious and playful.  I now recognise how stuck I was in a pattern of suffering and pain.

Curiosity is within us all from birth and is a quality that is easily lost due to conditions of upbringing.  It helps us to rediscover the goodness and beauty that is within us all.  It helps me reconnect to qualities of love, kindness and compassion which I believe are linked to curiosity and humour and are essentially rooted in the soul.  In essence, the mind believes it has our best interest at heart but it is often distracted and pulled away from its natural path of wisdom and wholeness. 

Taking ownership over the equation of stress is a choice that we can all make.  Mindfulness is the enzyme of hope that makes this possible and every journey needs a first step. 

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